Top 5 of the best desserts in Euskadi

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Gateau basque o pastel vasco.

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Although Idiazabal cheese is still the king of desserts in the Basque Country, for those who prefer to bet on sweets to finish a good lunch or dinner, we recommend our particular Top 5 of Basque pastries. Sweet-toothed and sweet-toothed, enjoy...

Mamia.
Mamia.

Mamia

Known as 'mamia' or 'gatzatua' in Basque, curdling is one of the most basic strategies for extending the life of milk and dates back to the Neolithic period. With the passage of time it has become a dessert that is never missing in Basque restaurants. The original is made with sheep's or goat's milk. But the most common is cow's milk. Accompany it with good artisanal honey.

Goxua.
Goxua.

Goxua

Delicious recipe from Alava, specifically from its capital Vitoria - Gasteiz, whose meaning in Basque means sweet and rich. The dessert consists of three layers: a layer of whipped cream, a layer of sponge cake and a layer of cream. The surface is sprinkled with sugar and burned with a blowtorch.

Pantxineta.
Pantxineta.

Pantxineta

It is a pastry made with a puff pastry dough with almonds, filled with cream and decorated with powdered sugar. It is recommended to eat it tipio to maximize the flavor. This emblematic dessert of San Sebastian has French origins. At that time, "Casa Otaegui" was already a renowned confectionery in the city, as it supplied sweets to the royalty, who then spent their summers in Donostia.

Intxaursalsa
Intxaursalsa

Intxaursalsa

It is a nut cream similar to a custard, but thicker. It has been eaten in Basque farmhouses for more than 150 years, especially in Gipuzkoa. It is made from crushed walnuts, milk, sugar and sometimes cinnamon.

Pastel Vasco o Gateau Basque.
Pastel Vasco o Gateau Basque.

Basque Cake

Basque pastry is a kind of shortcrust pastry filled with cream. The Basque cake (in French gâteau basque and in Basque biskotxa or pastiza) originated in the 18th century in the town of Cambo in Labortana, and was filled with fruit such as figs, blackberries and Itsasu cherries. From the 19th century onwards, it began to be filled with pastry cream. The French version is usually topped with a layer of jam or marmalade.

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